Press & News Reports

Current BiologyCurrent Biology_Dispatches, April 4, 2016

Mate Choice: Charting Desire's Tangled Bank

Commentary on Scott Juntti's publication
Ryan York FrontiersFrontiers Blog, March 30, 2016

Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution: Fittest Articles of 2015

"Evolution of bower building in Lake Malawi cichlid fish: phylogeny, morphology, and behavior" - Ryan York, Stanford University
Press_ScottJunttiStanford Report, March 18, 2016

Stanford scientists identify genetic switch for female sexual behavior

By studying the complex mating routine of African cichlid fish, a team of Stanford scientists has keyed in on a single brain receptor in female fish that determines whether they successfully reproduce.
Natural History March 2016Natural History Magazine, March 6, 2016

Samplings_ Epigenetic Supremacy

Press_SUNews03182015Stanford News, January 5, 2016

Stanford biologists discover that flexible gene expression may regulate social status in male fish

Press_futurity03202015FUTURITY_SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, March 20, 2015

Why some male cichlids build 'Sand Castles'

Press_eSciNews_03182015eScience News, March 18, 2015

Male fish dig pits and build sand castles at the bottom of Lake Malawi to attract females

Press_BioNewsNet_03182015Biology News Net, March 18, 2015

Male fish did pits and build sand castles at the bottom of Lake Malawi to attract females

Press_BizInsider03192015Business Insider Australia, March 19, 2015

Meet the male fish who builds sand castles just to attract females

Press_Science2.0_03182015Science 2.0, March 18, 2015

Compensation: Why Some Male Cichlids Build Sand Castles To Attract Females And Others Don't

Press_Fis_03202015FiS USA, March 20, 2015

New findings on Lake Malawi cichlid courtship rituals

Press-rawstory03182015RawStory, March 18, 2015

'That's what the ladies want':Fish castles made of sand are often built out of love

Press_HealthCanal03182015HealthCanal, March 18, 2015

Stanford biologists show how the evolution of physical traits can influence behavior

Press_Eurekalert-3182015EurekAlert! AAAS, March 18, 2015

Male fish dig pits and build sand castles at the bottom of Lake Malawi to attract females

Press_UniHerald04102015University Herald, March 18, 2015

Male Fish Build Sand Castles To Attract Females

Press_IBT03182015International Business Times, March 18, 2015

Fish sand castles and pits reveal rapid courtship evolution in Lake Malawi cichlids

press_2015_0319PHYS.ORG, March 19, 2015

Biologists show how the evolution of physical traits can influence behavior


Male fish dig pits and build sand castles at the bottom of Lake Malawi to attract females
Press_SUNews03182015Stanford News, March 18, 2015

Stanford biologists show how the evolution of physical traits can influence behavior

Press_Yahoo2015_0318Yahoo!News UK & Ireland, March 18, 2015

Fish sand castles and pits reveal rapid courtship evolution in Lake Malawi cichlids

The Scientist, October 18, 2005

Getting on top, genetically


Study shows rapid genetic response to social opportunity in cichlid fish. PDF
Science Friday, January 25, 2007

Anglers Beware: Fish Capable of Logical Inference

The study, published in the Jan. 25 edition of the journal Nature, is based on a unique experiment with cichlids (SIK-lids), small territorial fish from Africa.
Rueters, January 24, 2007

Fish use logic to size up rivals

Male fish, like humans, use a sophisticated form of logical reasoning to assess potential rivals, scientists said.
Nature News, October 10, 2014

Fish fail to see reflections as rivals

Not all cichlids react aggressively to their reflections, casting doubt on the use of mirrors in behavioural studies.
PLoS Biology, October 2005

Rapid genomic and physiological responses for social dominance

For many animals, possibly even for humans, mating success is determined by social status or dominance.
Christian Science Monitor, January 25, 2007

On the horizon: Pecking order ... for fish

How does little Nemo determine his social standing in a school of fish? If scientists at Stanford University in California are correct, he uses logical inference, just as humans do.
ZEBRAFISH, Volume 3, Number 2, 2006

Investigator Profile: An Interview with Russell D. Fernald, Ph.D.

The Daily Cardinal, The University of Wisconsin – Madison, February 18, 2007

One Fish, Two Fish, Dumb Fish, Dead Fish

In the war for survival, it pays for males to choose their battles wisely, especially when food and females are involved. The poor guy who makes the mistake of picking a fight and losing is unlikely to attract many mates.
Endocrine News, December 2010

Suppressed Males’ Response to Reproductive Opportunity

In many species the social environment is important in regulating reproductive physiology.
Stanford Report, September 22, 2014

Cichlid fish genome helps tell story of adaptive evolution, Stanford scientists say

African cichlid fish represent an unusual variety of evolutionary divergence. By analyzing the genomes of some of these species, Russell Fernald and others have provided insight into the genetic mechanisms that drive species diversification.
Stanford Report, July 13, 2011

Fish get ready for sex in a hurry

Watch the video, click the image.
Stanford Report, July 13, 2011

Male African cichlid fish go from 'zero to 60' when mating calls, Stanford researchers find

In African cichlid fish society, only the dominant male reproduces. But Stanford researchers have found that if the dominant male disappears, a subordinate cichlid can rise to the procreative occasion with stunning speed, having kept its reproductive apparatus idling in low gear for the occasion.
Stanford Report, November 24, 2010

Female fish – and humans? – lose interest when their male loses a slugfest, Stanford researchers say

If you see your special someone lose a competition, your subconscious may start whispering, "He's a loser," even as you insist your love is unaffected, according to Stanford researchers studying African cichlid fish.
Stanford Report, January 25, 2007

Study: Cichlids can determine their social rank by observation

A male fish can size up potential rivals, and even rank them from strongest to weakest, simply by watching how they perform in territorial fights with other males...
Stanford Report, October 19, 2005

Social status triggers genetic response in male cichlid fish

Throughout the animal kingdom, rival males routinely challenge one another for the right to reproduce.
Science News, May 12, 2010

Something Fishy in the Mirror

What do fish see when they look in the mirror? Not themselves. Since the 1930s, studies have shown that fish will fight their own reflections. And it turns out that they hate themselves more than they hate other fish.
Genome Biology Research News, 19 October 2005

Getting on top, genetically

For the first time, scientists have directly linked social cues to an immediate genetic response in the brain, according to a new study in PloS Biology.
Journal of Computational Biology, October 12, 2005

New algorithm for Real-time PCR analysis—Miner

Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (qRT-PCR) have become the method of choice for rapid, sensitive, quantitative comparison of RNA transcript abundance.